Great (deceased) Jamaicans

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
11/12/16 10:40:10 AM 
Gregory Isaacs....

'International stardom seemed assured in 1978 when Isaacs signed to the Virgin Records offshoot Front Line Records, and appeared in the film Rockers, in which he performed "Slavemaster". The Cool Ruler (which became one of his nicknames) and Soon Forward albums, however, failed to sell as well as expected, although they are now considered among his best work. In 1981, he made his first appearance at the Reggae Sunsplash festival (returning annually until 1991), and he moved on to the Charisma Records offshoot Pre, who released his The Lonely Lover (another nickname that stuck) and More Gregory albums along with a string of increasingly successful singles including "Tune In", "Permanent Lover", "Wailing Rudy" and "Tribute to Waddy". He signed to Island Records and released the record that finally saw him break through to a wider audience, "Night Nurse", the title track from his first album for the label (Night Nurse (1982)). Although "Night Nurse" was not a chart hit in either the UK or US, it was hugely popular in clubs and received heavy radio play, and the album reached number 32 in the UK. This success for Isaacs coincided with drug problems with cocaine that saw him serve a six-month prison sentence in Kingston in 1982 for possession of unlicensed firearms. Isaacs claimed that he had the weapons only for protection, but it emerged that this was his 27th arrest and that he had become involved in drug dealing and was addicted to crack cocaine. He celebrated his release from prison with his second album for Island, Out Deh! (1983). He was featured in the 1982 documentary Land of Look Behind. When his contract with Island ended, Isaacs returned in 1984 with the "Kool Ruler Come Again" single, and began a period of prolific recording, working with producers including Prince Jammy, Hugh "Redman" James, Bobby Digital, Tad Dawkins and Steely & Clevie, maintaining a consistent standard despite the volume of work produced. Isaacs then built a strong relationship with Gussie Clarke of the Music Works label. They began with Isaacs' 1985 album Private Beach Party, and had a massive hit with "Rumours" in 1988, which was followed by further popular singles including "Mind Yu Dis", "Rough Neck", "Too Good To Be True" and "Report to Me". The association with Clarke continued into the early 1990s, teaming up with singers including Freddie McGregor, Ninjaman and J.C. Lodge. He dueted with Beres Hammond on the 1993 Philip "Fatis" Burrell-produced "One Good Turn", Burrell also producing Isaacs' 1994 album Midnight Confidential. In the 1990s the African Museum label continued to release all of Isaacs' music, and that of artists he produced. In 1997 Simply Red covered "Night Nurse" and had a hit with it. Isaacs continued to record and perform live in the 2000s. In 2005 Lady Saw produced another version of "Night Nurse" with her toasting over the original lyrics. Isaacs' drug addiction had a major impact on his voice, with most of his teeth falling out as a result. Isaacs said of his addiction in 2007: "Drugs are a debasing weapon. It was the greatest college ever, but the most expensive school fee ever paid – the Cocaine High School. I learnt everything, and now I've put it on the side." He also performed at the ICC Cricket World Cup 2007 Inauguration at Jamaica. In 2007 he collaborated with the Spanish rap group Flowklorikos / Rafael Lechowski album Donde Duele Inspira. In 2008, after some 40 years as a recording artist, Isaacs released a new studio album Brand New Me, which was nominated for the Grammy Awards for 2010. The album received positive reviews from critics, such as this review from Reggae Vibes: "Gregory is back, and how! 'Brand New Me' is a very suitable album title for the cool ruler's new album. He is back in a different style, more or less like we were used to from this great 'lovers & roots' artist" This was followed in 2009 by the album My Kind Of Lady. In 2010, Gregory Isaacs put out the last of his albums to be released while he was still living; Isaacs Meets Isaac, with Zimbabwean reggae singer King Isaac. In November 2010, Isaacs Meets Isaac was nominated for Best Reggae Album for the 2011 Grammy Awards, giving Gregory Isaacs his fourth Grammy nomination, and Zimbabwe's King Isaac his first.'

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link buds Joined: Nov 15, 2002
Posts: 18868
11/12/16 7:11:35 PM 
avatar image
In reply to mikesiva

The Cool Ruler--My favourite Artist--
Love is Overdue--

HIsaacs aka Buds

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
11/16/16 9:22:50 AM 
In reply to buds

What a silky, smooth voice....
cool
I've been listening to a CD of him while driving. And I just watched a BBC programme of Reggae at the BBC, and sure enough, Gregory was there, singing "Night Nurse".

John Figueroa....

'Figueroa was born in Jamaica, where he was educated at St George's College. He won a scholarship to attend Holy Cross College, Massachusetts, graduating in 1942, after which he taught at St George's College and at Wolmer Boys' College in Jamaica. In 1946 he went on a British Council fellowship to London University to study for a teaching diploma and a master's degree in education. He subsequently taught in some London schools, and spent six years as an English and philosophy lecturer at the Institute of Education. He also contributed criticism, stories and poetry to the BBC's Caribbean Voices radio programme produced by Henry Swanzy. In Jamaica Figueroa became the first West Indian to be appointed to a chair at the University College of the West Indies, and the first Dean of the Faculty of Education. Between 1964 and 1966 he was a visiting professor first at Rhode Island University and then Indiana University. In the early 1970s he became Professor of Humanities leading the Department of Education of the Centro Caribeno de Estudios Postgraduados, Puerto Rico. He later spend time as a professor at the University of Jos in Nigeria. In the 1980s he moved to the UK, where he worked for the Open University, was a Fellow at the Centre for Caribbean Studies, University of Warwick, and an adviser in multicultural education in Manchester. He edited the pioneering two-volume anthology Caribbean Voices (vol 1: Dreams and Visions and vol 2: The Blue Horizons, 1966 and 1970 respectively), comprehensive landmark collections of West Indian poetry. He was also the first general editor of the Heinemann Caribbean Writers Series. He also played an important role in the development of Caribbean studies as a founder member of the Caribbean Studies Association and the Society for Caribbean Studies. His own poetry "reflects his origins as a Jamaican of [Hispanic] descent and a Catholic who, whilst deeply committed to the Caribbean, was concerned to maintain [the diversity of its] heritage without apology. He insisted that drums were not the only Caribbean musical instrument (no doubt a dig at Kamau Brathwaite) and championed Derek Walcott's relationship to the classical and European literary tradition. Ironically, one of Figueroa's most effective poems is in Nation language." In the words of Andrew Salkey, "The phrase 'cosmopolitan poet' does not really adequately describe him or the impact that he has had on Anglophone Caribbean poetry, but it certainly goes some way in defining a part of his concern in not being tagged as regional or provincial. This is so because he is absolutely free from national limitations."'

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
11/19/16 7:23:18 AM 
'Trevor Rhone, was the last child of twenty-one, grew up in a tiny town of Bellas Gate in Jamaica. After seeing his first play at the age of nine he fell in love with theatre. Educated at Beckford & Smith High School now known as the St. Jago High School, , He began his theatre career as a teacher after a three-year stint at Rose Bruford College, an English drama school, where he studied in the early 1960s on scholarship. He was part of the renaissance of Jamaican theatre in the early 1970s. Rhone participated in a group called Theatre '77, which established The Barn, a small theatre in Kingston, Jamaica, to stage local performances. The vision of the group that came together in 1965 was that in 12 years, by 1977, there would be professional theatre in Jamaica. His prolific work includes the films The Harder They Come (1972), co-author; Smile Orange (1974), based on his play of the same name; Top Rankin′; Milk and Honey (1988 ), winner; One Love (2003), Cannes Film Festival favorite. He was awarded the Musgrave Gold Medal in 1988 for his work by the Institute of Jamaica.'

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link Ewart Joined: Mar 5, 2005
Posts: 8791
11/19/16 1:38:57 PM 
In reply to mikesiva


Nice. Trevor was my bredrin since we met together on stage at the Ward Theatre in the fall of 1957 rehearsing for the LTM Pantomime, Busha Bluebeard.

I rank his play, Old Story Time as the best stage production I have seen in Jamaica, and the best internationally along with a 1975 staging of Richard III at Stratford On Avon.


//

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
11/22/16 5:22:21 AM 
In reply to Ewart

One great writer deserves another great writer....

'Victor Stafford Reid (1 May 1913 - 25 August 1987) was a Jamaican writer born in Kingston, Jamaica, who wrote with an intent of influencing the younger generations. He was awarded the silver (1950) and gold (1976) Musgrave Medals , the Order of Jamaica (1980) and the Norman Manley Award for Excellence in Literature in 1981. He was the author of several novels, three of which were aimed towards children, one play production, and several short stories. Two of his most notable works are New Day - "the first West Indian novel to be written throughout in a dialect form" - and The Leopard. As a writer, Reid aimed to instil an awareness of legacy and tradition among the Jamaican people. His writings reflected many of the social and cultural hardships that pervade the time periods illustrated in his literary works. As literary critic Edward Baugh has stated, "[Reid’s] writing shows a fondness for the rebel with a cause… he wanted people to learn about their heritage through his writing." Reid was one of a handful of writers to emerge from the new literary and nationalist movement that seized Jamaican sentiment in the period of the late 1930s. From this "new art" surfaced many of Reid’s literary contemporaries, including Roger Mais, George Campbell, M. G. Smith, and H. D. Carberry. A common objective among this new generation of writers was an inclination to "break away from Victorianism and to associate with the Jamaican independence movement." Reid’s emphasis on resistance and struggle is reaffirmed in a 1978 lecture he delivered at the Institute of Jamaica on the topic of cultural revolution in Jamaica post-1938. In the address, Reid contended that the collective discontent of the working class majority was the public assertion of a "new brand of loyalty" that situated itself not only beyond, but more importantly, in direct resistance to imperial rule.'

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
11/27/16 6:24:45 AM 
Perry Henzell....

'Henzell, whose ancestors included Huguenot glassblowers and an old English family who had made their fortune growing sugar on Antigua, grew up on the Caymanas sugar cane estate near Kingston. He was sent to Shrewsbury School in the United Kingdom at 14 and later attended McGill University in Montreal in 1953 and 1954. He then dropped out of this school, choosing instead to hitchhike around Europe. He eventually got work as a stagehand at the BBC. He returned in the 1950s to Jamaica, where he directed advertisements for some years until he began work on The Harder They Come with co-writer Trevor D. Rhone. In 1965 he married Sally Densham. Henzell also shot some footage for what was planned as his next film, No Place Like Home, in Harder's aftermath, but he went broke before he could finish the film. Fed up by this, and the lack of finance for further production, he went on to become a writer, publishing his first novel, Power Game, in 1982. Both were meant to complete a planned trilogy of films centring on Ivanhoe Martin. The footage for No Place Like Home was lost. Years later, he came across editing tapes in a lab in New York. Just to have a sense of completion, he worked on the project. When he showed it to a few friends, their response was enthusiastic. He eventually was able to retrieve the original footage. No Place Like Home was screened for the public at the 31st annual Toronto International Film Festival in September 2006 at the Cumberland Theatre; it was sold out. Film leads Carl Bradshaw (The Harder They Come, Smile Orange, Countryman) and Susan O'Meara attended and answered audience questions with Henzell after the screening. The film was scheduled to be screened at the Flashpoint Film Festival at the beginning of December 2006 in Negril. Henzell died of cancer on 30 November 2006, aged 70, and is survived by his widow Sally and three children: Justine, Toni-Ann and Jason.'

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
11/29/16 4:07:30 AM 
Byron Lee....

'Lee was born in Christiana, Manchester Parish, Jamaica, to an Afro-Jamaican mother and a Chinese father (a language teacher) originally from Kowloon, Hong Kong. His mother was from Auchtembeddie, where mento and junkanoo were popular musical forms, and his family actively upheld the cultural and musical traditions of their African ancestors. The family moved to the Mountain View Gardens area of Kingston when Lee was around 8 or 9 years old. He learned to play piano at a convent school in Mandeville, but put music on hold when he became a member of the Jamaican national football team. He taught himself to play bass on a homemade instrument, and around 1950, along with his friend Carl Brady, he formed the first incarnation of the Dragonaires, named after the college football team that they played for, at that time concentrating on mento. The band turned professional in 1956 and went on to become one of Jamaica's leading ska bands, continuing since and taking in other genres such as calypso, Soca, and Mas. According to Michael E. Veal in his book Dub: soundscapes and shattered songs in Jamaican reggae, Wesleyan University Press, 2007), Byron Lee is known to have introduced the electric bass guitar to Jamaica in late 1959 or 1960. However, the reason Lee began to use the electric bass as opposed to the double bass had nothing to do with sound. Rather, it was a way for Lee to avoid carrying the large and heavy double bass to the truck to move from gig to gig. The bass guitar soon gained popularity throughout the country and soon became the standard. The electric bass's louder, clearer, and more in-your-face sound soon changed the entire sound of Jamaican music entirely, especially after Skatalites bassist Lloyd Brevett took a liking to it. Lee also worked as a producer, producing many of the ska singles by The Maytals, and his entrepreneurial skills led to him setting up the Byron Lee's Spectacular Show tour, which involved several Jamaican acts (including The Maytals) touring the Caribbean. He also became the head of distribution in Jamaica for Atlantic Records. Lee purchased the West Indies Records Limited (WIRL) recording studios from Edward Seaga after fire had destroyed the pressing plant on the same site, and renamed it Dynamic Sounds, soon having a new pressing facility built on the site. It soon became one of the best-equipped studios in the Caribbean, attracting both local and international recording artists, including Paul Simon and The Rolling Stones, who recorded their famous song "Angie" there. Lee's productions included Boris Gardiner's Reggae Happening, Hopeton Lewis's Grooving Out on Life, and The Slickers' "Johnny Too Bad". Dynamic also acts as one of Jamaica's leading record distributors. In 1990, Lee inaugurated what became an annual event, the Byron Lee Jamaica Carnival, held on Constant Spring Road, and attended by hundreds of thousands of people that united the "uptown" and "downtown" residents of Kingston, an event that Lee called "the happiest moment in my life". Lee had performed with the Dragonaires at carnivals around the Caribbean since the mid-1970s, and chose the location for the carnival to attract revellers from all of Jamaica's classes, stating: "The biggest problem was that most Jamaicans said it wouldn't work, that it isn't a carnival country, but I persisted 'cause I believed in it. I wanted carnival to go to the public. You always had other carnivals that were held mostly indoor, where persons had to pay to get in. I went to the people and choose Half-Way Tree where uptown and downtown meet. That is where the route will remain". While in the early days of ska, Lee was credited in taking it from the ghettos and giving it appeal among Jamaica's "uptown" middle- and upper-classes. He has also been credited with taking soca in the opposite direction, popularising a genre that had previously only been enjoyed in Jamaica among the upper classes, with the island's working class.'

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
12/8/16 6:29:37 AM 
Dennis Scott....

'Scott was one of the most significant poets writing in the early post-independence period in Jamaica, and his first published collection, Uncle Time (1973), for which he won the Commonwealth Poetry Prize, is marked by an effective literary use of the vernacular, or "nation language". He has been regarded as one of the main influences for modern Jamaican poetry. His other poetry collections are Dreadwalk: Poems 1970–78 (1982), Strategies (1989) and After-Image (2008 ). His plays include Terminus (1966), Dog, and An Echo in the Bone (1974); the latter was published, together with a play by Derek Walcott and one by Errol Hill, in Plays for Today (1985), edited by Hill. Scott's dramatic work is acknowledged as a major influence on the direction of Caribbean theatre. Who lives in a pineapple by Dennis Scott.'

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link pelon Joined: Mar 22, 2008
Posts: 5948
12/8/16 8:54:37 AM 
[This, perhaps the best thread of all time]




[So enjoyable to read the contributions]

link Ewart Joined: Mar 5, 2005
Posts: 8791
12/8/16 11:27:48 AM 
In reply to mikesiva

Your piece on Byron Lee sent me to my archives. This is what I pulled out:


HOW LONG SHALL THEY KILL OUR PROPHETS?

by Ewart Walters
Copyright Ewart Walters 2009

May 1991 - Around this tenth anniversary of Bob Marley's death, one of the biggest talking points in the land of his birth is whether Soca is killing Reggae. Soca (a contraction of Soul and Calypso) is the reigning music of Trinidad and Tobago, the land that created the only musical art form in the Western Hemisphere this century - the steel band. Reggae is the born-in-Jamaica art form that Bob Marley (mainly) popularized the world over. The other big talking point is the wrangling over Bob's shrinking (legal fees are very costly) multi-million dollar estate. Fortunately, it now seems that his heirs have finally decided to come together to fight against a threat to sell his estate to foreigners. So what's the problem, you ask. Well, let's start at the beginning.

Strange as it may seem now to outsiders, Jamaicans have been culturized to look outside themselves for things of value and worth. In food this means having corn flakes and American apples instead of boiled green bananas and Ottaheiti apples. In dance, it meant a suppression of earlier dance forms such as the mento and the quadrille in favour of the waltz and the rock-and-roll. In music Jamaicans of the late 1950s and early 1960s tuned in night after night to the American station WINZ for the latest rhythm-and-blues and rock-and-roll offerings. Reggae's forerunner, the Ska, which displaced the mento and the Jamaica Calypso of the 1940’s and 50’s, was contemptuously dismissed as "dutty ska" (dirty ska) until Jamaicans Millie Small and later Desmond Dekker and Jimmy Cliff who had all migrated to England, shook the very portals of "the mother country" with it and started reaping fame and fortune out of the home-grown art form in England. Once England approved, then it could be good enough for Jamaica.

It was about this time Byron Lee formed his Dragonaires and took his own path to popularity through the new Ska sounds that were wailing all over Jamaica. Urged by a young Minister of Development and Welfare in the person of Edward Seaga, Byron Lee took on the task of popularizing the new Jamaican sound both in Jamaica and overseas. Calling himself "Jamaica's Musical Ambassador", Lee went on several tours around the Caribbean playing mostly Ska, did a lot of work with the Calypso King of the World, the Mighty Sparrow, and eventually became a fixture at Trinidad Carnival, playing mostly Ska and calypso.

The Mona campus of the University of the West Indies was established in the shadow of the Blue Mountains in 1947 and began almost immediately to make an impact on Jamaica. The Students Union at Mona was the venue for some of Kingston's best parties as, for the next two decades, Friday and Saturday nights bore witness to regular meetings between music and dancing feet.


But what was the music? With the exception of the offerings of Carlos Malcolm and his Afro-Jamaican Rhythms, the music was almost entirely Trinidadian. The students quickly formed a steel band, and a very good steel band it was in the late 1950s. The steel band took over as the mainstay of the Students' Union and in acculturizing the Jamaican and other (non-Trinidadian) students with a heavy dose of Trinidadian culture, also succeeded in spreading the gospel of steel band off campus and into greater Kingston.

An Eastern Caribbean culture enveloped the Mona campus much to the distress of the island's newspaper, the Daily Gleaner, which had difficulty making up its mind what it disliked more -- Eastern Caribbean culture or the University's Faculty of Social Sciences. The Gleaner notwithstanding, there emerged such a thing as a "Mona accent" as students, kept apart by miles of Caribbean Sea, finally came together. What is more - as the Trinidadians brought to Mona the whole new world of j'ouvert, bacchanal, play mass, Carnival Queen, Carnival bands and so on - Carnival, which was previously unknown there, came to Jamaica, or at least to Mona.

But the emergence of the made-in-Jamaica music - from Ska through Rock Steady - in the early 1960s could not be held back. As a former habitué of the Student's Union of the late 1950s, I got the shock of my life when I returned to Jamaica in 1968 after four years in Canada.

Taking in a party at the Student's Union I discovered a major change had taken place. Jamaican culture was not simply dominant; it was pervasive. There was no steel band in sight. Rock Steady “was a carry the swing” as they were to say later. I will never forget the obvious joy with which the rock-steady revellers sang with Bob Andy, “I've got to go back home, even if I've got to walk, I've got to go back home”, their voices swelling joyously "taa na na na nap ta-nap, taa na na na nap ta-nap, tap tap, taa taa na na na nap" with the trombone chorus.

By this time too, aided by the accumulated works of Laurel Aitken, the Blues Busters, Wilfred (Jackie) Edwards, the Wailing Wailers, Higgs and Hill, Alton Ellis, Hortense Ellis, Girl Satchmo, the Ethiopians, the Melodians, Prince Buster, Delroy Morgan, Dennis Brown, Stranger Cole, John Holt, Ken Boothe, Don Drummond, the Skatalites, Justin Hines and the Dominoes, and others, there was a growing body of songs and music that had become popular. All these were creators of original music.

Not so Byron Lee, whose Dragonaires in those days made several records covering the newly created Jamaican songs, and had only one original tune themselves in “Dragon's Paradise.” Lee went on to become Jamaica's "musical ambassador", taking the Ska, the first Reggay (sic) and Rock Steady to the US and UK as well as the Caribbean.

But when in the early 1970s, British singer-guitarist Eric Clapton recorded "I Shot The Sheriff", the song did extremely well and catapulted the song-writer to American recognition and fame. And who wrote the song? Robert Nesta Marley, a young man from Trench Town (downtown) who would go on to become the world's best known Jamaican, taking reggae rhythms to crowds in the hundreds of thousands in France, Germany, Europe, Australia and all over Africa, not to mention the US and Canada. It is to Marley that we can attribute the rapid spread of the infectious reggae to the extent that just about every singer of stature has found it necessary to incorporate reggae offerings in their albums and repertoire.


Musically, Jamaica was on the map. And yet, and yet; a music is not without honour except in its own country. Addressing the 1975 Commonwealth Heads of Government Conference in Kingston, Indian Prime Minister Indira Ghandi spoke with feeling about the gift of music which Jamaica had given to the world. Anyone listening to Jamaica's radio stations that week would wonder what she was talking about.

Like a spite, the radio music was decidedly not home-grown. But this was not a passing aberration. Friends of Jamaicans overseas have hankered after a Jamaican holiday only to return and say they did not hear any reggae while they were in the island. A visitor to an uptown party in the late 1970s to mid 1980s would find that American music was again carrying the swing. To hear reggae, a visitor would have to go downtown Kingston where “the sufferers” have maintained their love affair with made-in-Jamaica music - along with boiled green bananas.

In the meantime, "uptowners" - many of whom were graduates of the UWI Mona Carnival - began going to Trinidad Carnival each February from the mid 1970s. Back in Jamaica, their appetites for Soca grew - aided and abetted by the proliferation of "dub" and "dance hall" reggae, heavy drum-and-bass and rap "riddims" at the expense of harmony, and sometimes melody, so much so that some wondered aloud if it was still "music."

This led in the 1980s to the development of a small Orange Carnival in a section of St. Andrew to which you came by invitation. This exploded in 1990 and 1991 into a full blown Carnival, so big and so successful that it has the Trinidadians worried. It also has some Jamaicans worrying that "Soca is going to kill Reggae."

And what is the role of Jamaica's "musical ambassador" in all this? Head cook and Soca-winer.

A few years before, Byron Lee was the centre of a controversy because of remarks he allegedly made that reggae losing popularity and not making it overseas, adding that reggae did not employ brass. Who could he possibly have been listening to? Certainly not Lester Bowie (Coming Back Jamaica on the Brass Fantasy album), for one. His own Dragonaires feature a strong brass section that has never prevented him from playing reggae. If he was worrying about how hard it would be to spread Reggae overseas because of (Jamaican) lyrics, how does he explain the fact that only one Soca tune - Arrow's “Hot, Hot, Hot” - has ever made any impact on North America, while US record companies continue to sign up Dance Hallers like Ninja Man, Coco Tea and others? Now, to his dismay, he is seen as the Axeman of Reggae.

But, even if that were his stated intention, Byron Lee cannot destroy reggae. The stone the musical builders continue to refuse had long become the head stone of the corner. More to the point, the success of Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff, Peter Tosh, Burning Spear, Third World, Culture, and others, was predicated also on the movement of the ownership of record-producing facilities from “uptown” people to “downtown” people. Khouri's Federal Record Manufacturing no longer appears in the Jamaica telephone book. Byron Lee's Dynamic Sounds is still there.

But now there are also Tuff Gong, Ziggy's Record Manufacturing, Creative Sounds, Music Works Recording Studio, Sound Lab Recording Studio and others. The impression is that the ownership of most of these reflects the shift from “uptowners” to “downtowners” that has followed the financial success Reggae has brought to Jamaican singers who are almost entirely “downtowners” and many of whom are now in control of the business of reggae. This explosion cannot have taken place without having some impact on the business carried out by Lee's Dynamic Sounds. This, too, is part of Bob Marley's legacy.


If by some extended stretch of the imagination, reggae were to be killed in Jamaica, the country would have to be isolated completely from the rest of the world. While his relatives squabbled over his estate almost up to ten years after he died in a Miami hospital without making a will, Bob's joy is for I an' I, and neither that squabble nor the Soca-St. Andrew syndrome shows any sign of reducing the spread of reggae worldwide. Jamaicans would have to put up with the anguish of hearing foreign reggae coming back into the country of its creation.

So, as we mark the first decade after the Reggae King, Bob's main legacy is still very much in place. However, we should never forget the pained question he asks in the last song of his last album:

"How long shall they kill our prophets While we stand aside and look?" - Redemption Song.


//

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
12/10/16 10:12:25 AM 
In reply to Ewart and pelon

Fascinating!

cool
'Cicely Delphin Williams (2 December 1893 – 13 July 1992) was a Jamaican physician, most notable for her discovery and research into kwashiorkor, a condition of advanced malnutrition, and her campaign against the use of sweetened condensed milk and other artificial baby milks as substitutes for human breast milk. One of the first female graduates of Oxford University, Dr Williams was instrumental in advancing the field of maternal and child health in developing nations, and in 1948 became the first director of Mother and Child Health (MCH) at the newly created World Health Organization (WHO). She once remarked that "if you learn your nutrition from a biochemist, you're not likely to learn how essential it is to blow a baby's nose before expecting him to suck."'

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
12/13/16 4:57:21 AM 
'Francis Barber (c1742/3 – 13 January 1801), born Quashey, was the Jamaican manservant of Samuel Johnson in London from 1752 until Johnson's death. Johnson made him his residual heir, with £70 a year to be given him by Trustees, expressing the wish that he move from London to Lichfield, in Staffordshire, Johnson's native city. After Johnson's death, Barber did this, opening a draper's shop and marrying a local woman. Barber was also bequeathed Johnson's books and papers, and a gold watch. In later years he had acted as Johnson's assistant in revising his famous Dictionary of the English Language and other works. Barber was also an important source for Boswell concerning Johnson's life in the years before Boswell himself knew Johnson.'

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
12/21/16 6:38:46 AM 
'Born in Accompong Jamaica, Namba Roy settled in South London after World War Two where he established himself as both a writer and artist. Despite migration, Namba Roy was always conscious of his Caribbean-African heritage especially the tradition of rebellion and courage that was a part of the runaway slaves, maroon history and settlement in his home town, Accompong. His novels Black Albino and No Black Sparrows written in the 1950s recreate this history and are a testament to black culture. The Jamaica Maroons were among the earliest of the black men in the West Indies to achieve and hold their freedom from slavery. They established themselves in remote communities in the mountains. Namba Roy was a Maroon descendant. His novel Black Albino is set in a Maroon community in the Jamaican hills in the eighteenth century. This historical novel imaginatively reconstructs the Jamaican Maroon world. The early Maroons had fresh memories of Africa and Africa appears in the novel in the Maroons' organizational life and language. In the same way, Roy’s paintings and sculpture are suggestive of African themes and a proud past. Many of his images suggest the princely heritage of ancient Africa and whether mythical or otherwise, they serve to uplift the race. Although Namba Roy was self-taught, he was well read with a keen interest in developing his own talents as a painter and sculptor. In this way, he documented his technical understanding of his work, in his book Ivory as the Medium in 'Studio (1958 ) as well as formulating his own material for sculpting (or moulding) images involving a mixture of plastic resin and wood chippings. His proficiency in this medium is evidenced in works such Accompong Madonna (1958 ) currently on show in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Jamaica. He is best known, however for his ivories such as Spirit of the Black Stallion (c. 1952) and Jesus and his Mammy (1956), delicately hewn forms that also pay homage to Africa.'

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link np Joined: Nov 14, 2002
Posts: 24882
12/21/16 4:20:45 PM 
avatar image
In reply to mikesiva

Mike,
as you may know .. I worked with Dennis Scott during the mid 70s and early 80s before he left JC ... fantastic guy, great talent -- we had some good conversations on art, drama and politics especially because he was such a good listener. I say that because I've talke with many people some hear you, but they really aren't listening (that is making the serious and necessary mental connection with what is being said -- its just words to them).

This man listens .... RIP Dennis Scott.

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
12/23/16 10:27:09 AM 
In reply to np

Of course...you taught me in third form, and Dennis Scott taught me in first form.
big grin
I remember, as a first former, having an interesting conversation with him about the Hindu god Shiva, and how while it was pronounced Shiva in India, it was pronounced Siva in Sri Lanka. He had no airs and graces, and had no difficulty admitting he didn't know that, and that a new, high school student had just taught him something new.

Of course, I learnt a helluva lot more from him!

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
12/29/16 9:10:02 AM 
'Louis Celeste Lecesne (c. 1796 or 1798 – 22 November 1847), also known as Lewis Celeste Lecesne, was an anti-slavery activist from the Caribbean islands. Lecesne was on a committee to improve the rights of free men of colour. He was arrested twice, and transported for life from Jamaica with John Escoffery. Their case was taken up by Dr. Stephen Lushington. Lecesne was compensated after successfully having the case reversed by the British government. Lecesne became an activist against slavery and attended the world's first anti-slavery convention. He named his son after the British Member of Parliament who had fought for his case. Lecesne was a supporter when the 1839 Anti-Slavery Society was formed.'

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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
1/11/17 4:40:42 AM 
And now, a controversial figure...Nicholas Lawes was a planter, slave-owner, and governor. But he did introduce coffee to Jamaica.

'He was Chief Justice of Jamaica from 1698 to 1703 and Governor from 1718 to 1722. In his capacity as Governor during the Golden Age of Piracy he tried many pirates, among them "Calico Jack" Rackham, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, Robert Deal, & Charles Vane. He signed an arrangement with Jeremy, king of the Miskito, to bring some of his followers over to Jamaica to hunt down runaway slaves in 1720. Lawes married five widows in succession. No children survived from the first three marriages. James and Temple Lawes were the sons of his fourth wife Susannah Temple whom he married in 1698. She had previously been married to Samuel Bernard. Her father, Thomas Temple, is said to have given Lawes his Temple Hall, Jamaica estate as a dowry. Lawes later married Elizabeth Lawley (1690-1725). Their youngest surviving daughter, Judith Maria Lawes, married Simon Luttrell, 1st Earl of Carhampton and so became both wife and mother of the Earls of Carhampton. At Temple Hall Lawes experimented with a variety of crops and introduced the very lucrative coffee growing into the island in 1721 according to some sources or 1728 according to others. He is also credited with setting up the first printing press in Jamaica. He died 18 June 1731 in Jamaica.'

Nicholas Lawes

He's an example of how a planter of modest means acquired wealth through marrying widows, and then, through his wealth, engineered a marriage between his daughter and British aristocracy. The daughter of that marriage, Anne, married the brother of King George III, Henry Duke of Cumberland. So, the British royal family has ties to slave plantations in Jamaica.

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
1/20/17 4:41:23 AM 
'Abrahams' father was from Ethiopia and his mother was Coloured. He was born in Vrededorp, a suburb of Johannesburg, but left South Africa in 1939. He worked first as a sailor, and then as a journalist in London. Hoping to make his way as a writer, he faced considerable challenges as a South African, as Carol Polsgrove has shown in her history, Ending British Rule: Writers in a Common Cause (2009). Despite a manuscript reader's recommendation against publication, in 1942 Allen & Unwin brought out his Dark Testament, made up mostly of pieces he had carried with him from South Africa. Publisher Dorothy Crisp published his novels Song of the City (1945) and Mine Boy (1946). According to Nigerian scholar Kolawole Ogungbesan, Mine Boy became "the first African novel written in English to attract international attention." More books followed with publication in Britain and the United States: two novels —The Path of Thunder (1948 ) and Wild Conquest (1950); a journalistic account of a return journey to Africa, Return to Goli (1953); and a memoir, Tell Freedom (1954). While working in London, Abrahams lived with his wife Daphne in Loughton. He met several important black leaders and writers, including George Padmore, a leading figure in the Pan-African community there, Kwame Nkrumah of the Gold Coast and Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya, both later heads of state of their respective nations. In 1956, Abrahams published a roman à clef about the political community of which he had been a part in London: A Wreath for Udomo. His main character, Michael Udomo, who returns from London to his African country to preside over its transformation into an independent, industrial nation, appeared to be modeled chiefly on Nkrumah with a hint of Kenyatta. Other identifiable fictionalized figures included George Padmore. The novel concluded with Udomo's murder. Published the year before Nkrumah took the reins of independent Ghana, A Wreath for Udomo was not an optimistic forecast of Africa's future. Abrahams settled in Jamaica in 1956. In 1994 he was awarded the Musgrave Gold Medal for his writing and journalism by the Institute of Jamaica. One of South Africa's most prominent writers, his work deals with political and social issues, especially with racism. His novel Mine Boy (1946), one of the first works to bring him to critical attention, and his memoir Tell Freedom (1954) deal in part with apartheid. His other works include the story collection Dark Testament (1942) and the novels The Path of Thunder (1948 ), A Wreath for Udomo (1956), A Night of Their Own (1965), the Jamaica-set This Island Now (1966, the only one of his novels not set in Africa) and The View from Coyaba (1985). He also wrote This Island Now, which speaks to the ways power and money can change most people's perspectives.'

Peter Abrahams

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
1/27/17 5:23:30 AM 
'Karl Parboosingh was born in Highgate, St. Mary to Mr and Mrs Vivian Coy in 1923. He went to high school in Kingston, attending both the Calabar High School and the Wolmer’s School for Boys. In 1942, he left Jamaica to attend the Art Students League in New York. From there, he travelled worldwide, initially as a soldier in the US army during World War II in 1945, then to other international art centres to work and study, namely Rome and Paris (years later he was to name his son after the city). In 1952, he studied in Mexico, under the tutelage of Spanish painter, Jose Guttierez and Mexican muralist, David Alfaro Siquieros – the influence of socialist ideology is evident in some of his major works. Karl met and married his second wife Seya Parboosingh in New York, 1957 and credited himself as being instrumental to her, a creative writer, becoming a painter as well. They settled in Jamaica in 1958. Aside from his canvas works, he is additionally credited with the creation of several murals commissioned by the government and other entities – the social potential of public murals was being explored in Jamaica in the late 1950s and 60s. Such examples can be seen at the Norman Manley Law School at the University of the West Indies Mona Campus, the Church of the Resurrection in Duhaney Park and the Olympia International Art Centre in Papine where he was chosen as the centre’s first artist in residence. There he continued to live and worked until he took ill and died on May 18, 1975.'

Karl Parboosingh

link Ewart Joined: Mar 5, 2005
Posts: 8791
1/27/17 10:13:33 AM 
In reply to mikesiva


Does it say anywhere how a McCoy became a Parboosingh? Or is it that he took his wife's name??


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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
1/31/17 4:39:53 AM 
In reply to Ewart

I was trying to find out why Parboosingh changed his name, but no luck!

'Following Roots, she starred in the 1978 film Convoy as the Widow Woman, and she played Leona Hamiltons in Cornbread, Earl and Me. Sinclair received an Emmy Award nomination for her role as Belle in the miniseries Roots. Also in 1978 she co-starred in the short-lived sitcom Grandpa Goes to Washington. Sinclair went on to a long-running stint in the 1980s as nurse Ernestine Shoop on the series Trapper John, M.D. opposite Pernell Roberts. She received three Emmy nominations for her work on the show, and critic Donald Bogle praised her for "maintaining her composure and assurance no matter what the script imposed on her". In 1988, Sinclair played Queen Aoleon alongside James Earl Jones' King Jaffe Joffer in the Eddie Murphy comedy Coming to America, which reunited her on screen with her Roots husband and co-star John Amos. Later, both Sinclair and Jones would reunite as Queen and King for the roles of Sarabi, Simba’s mother, and Mufasa, Simba’s father, in the blockbuster Disney animated film The Lion King (1994), respectively. The film became one of the best-selling titles ever on home video. It would also be her last film role. The two also collaborated on the series Gabriel's Fire, which earned Sinclair an Emmy in 1991 for Best Supporting Actress in a Dramatic Series, famously beating out the expected winner, L.A. Law's Diana Muldaur. Sinclair played the role of Lally in the 1991 Channel 4 television miniseries The Orchid House (based on Phyllis Shand Allfrey's novel of the same name), directed by Horace Ové, and also received critical praise for her supporting role in the 1992 television movie Jonathan: The Boy Nobody Wanted with JoBeth Williams. In 1993 Sinclair came to London to appear on stage at the Cochrane Theatre in The Lion, by Michael Abbensetts, directed by Horace Ové for the Talawa Theatre Company. In 1994, she played a supporting role in the short-lived ABC-TV sitcom Me and the Boys, which starred Steve Harvey. Sinclair, in her brief role as the captain of the USS Saratoga in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, is commonly cited as the first female Starfleet starship captain to appear in Star Trek. (Joanne Linville had appeared as a Romulan commander 18 years earlier.) Years later, Sinclair played Geordi La Forge's mother, captain of the USS Hera, in Star Trek: The Next Generation's "Interface". Her final acting role was on the sitcom Dream On just one month later before her death.'

Madge Sinclair

link Ewart Joined: Mar 5, 2005
Posts: 8791
1/31/17 9:21:20 AM 
In reply to mikesiva

Yep. Met Madge Walters while she was at Shortwood Training College in the mid fifties...


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link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
2/8/17 5:25:19 AM 
In reply to Ewart

Really! I'm envious....
smile

'González was born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1943. He had a Puerto Rican father and Jamaican mother. González graduated from the Jamaica School of Art (The Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts) in 1963 where he majored in sculpture. He later became a faculty member at the school. González earned his Master's degree in Fine Arts from the California College of Arts and Crafts. He taught at schools and institutions in Jamaica, California, and Atlanta, Georgia, during his career. He was influenced by Edna Manley and Pablo Picasso. He lived and worked within the Saint Ann Parish area with his wife and family. González is, perhaps, best known for a 9-foot-tall (2.7 m) statue of Bob Marley, which is currently on display at a museum in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. The abstract stautue depicts Marley with a tree trunk for a lower body and a distorted face. The sculpture was pelted with fruit and rocks by angry Marley fans when it was unveiled in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1983 on the second anniversary of his death. González was also well known for creating two bronze reliefs that commemorate Jamaican independence from Great Britain. He also worked on the tomb of the former Prime Minister of Jamaica, Norman Washington Manley. Within Jamaica, examples of González's work is displayed at the Jamaica National Heroes' Memorial, the National Gallery of Jamaica, the residence of the Prime Minister and the Bank of Jamaica. He also held both group and solo art shows in Jamaica, the United States, Denmark, Cuba, Canada and Mexico. Christopher González died of cancer on 2 August 2008, in Cornwall Regional Hospital in Montego Bay, Jamaica, at the age of 65. He was survived by his wife, Champayne Clarke-Gonzalez, and six children Chinyere, Odiaka, Asha, Christina, Abenah, and Nailah Gonzalez.'

Christopher Gonzalez

link mikesiva Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 28574
2/15/17 10:21:10 AM 
'Louis Marriott (22 May 1935-1 August 2016) was a Jamaican actor, director, writer, broadcaster, the executive officer of the Michael Manley Foundation, and member of the Performing Right Society, Jamaica Federation of Musicians, and founding member of the Jamaica Association of Dramatic Artists. Marriott was born on the Old Pound Road, Saint Andrew, Jamaica, the son of Egbert Marriott and Edna Irene Thompson-Marriott. He was educated at Jamaica College. He died in Kingston at age 81 on 1 August 2016.'

Louis Marriott

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