Caribbean Expressions.

Pages: previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  next 
link black Joined: Feb 28, 2004
Posts: 25553
3/17/17 12:01:30 AM 
In reply to bravos

Yes and "what is joke for school chirren is death for crapaud".


We call them Crappo.
lol

link bravos Joined: Oct 14, 2009
Posts: 32868
3/17/17 1:48:21 PM 
In reply to black

Nah we spell it in the true french way..but we pronounce it 'crappo' though!! lol

link black Joined: Feb 28, 2004
Posts: 25553
3/17/17 1:50:37 PM 
In reply to bravos

Ok, French word.

Call me an idiot. lol

link Benjie Joined: Nov 29, 2002
Posts: 2541
3/17/17 2:12:00 PM 
guinea cock bring guinea hen - a make up story, an unbelievable excuse, a lie

Typically used by parents when I was younger. " I ask you why you come home so late and you telling me guinea cock bring guinea hen"

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
3/17/17 7:06:52 PM 
Folks always say that when Caribbean people leave the Caribbean they usually discover how similar they are. The similarity of these expressions shows how much we share in the vernacular. By the time the music, food and the cricket come een is one big 'cook-up'. big grin big grin

link bravos Joined: Oct 14, 2009
Posts: 32868
3/17/17 8:37:37 PM 
In reply to Headley

I always tell people I've traveled to major parts of the world and I never feel how I feel in a Caribbean country a few mins away,it's like a homecoming,its like family,you in foreign but you unnastan dem and dey unnasatn you and I don't mean accent etc,I mean in spirit and vibes...and I've noticed the same enthusiasm here with other islanders when they visit..

link Norm Joined: Nov 28, 2002
Posts: 22313
3/18/17 12:23:53 AM 
In reply to Benjie
I ask you why you come home so late and you telling me guinea cock bring guinea hen"

I heard that described as "a cock-and-bull story" by the older folk.

link Norm Joined: Nov 28, 2002
Posts: 22313
3/18/17 12:27:29 AM 
In reply to Headley

Some of the Calypsonians and reggae singers are great sources of Caribbean expressions. Guys like Sparrow, Lovindeer, Pluto, etc, use lots of Caribbean expressions.

Lovindeer, for example, talks about his "dingobob" in Wild Gilbert, and "you caan have two bull inna same pen" in "Doan ben down", etc.

Sparrow was in a league by himself in this respect too!

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
3/18/17 9:26:39 PM 
In reply to Norm

Yes that was one of the strong points and songwriting tools the kaisonans employed. As you noted Sparrow was the master.

Bob Marley also used it a lot. "Simmer down", "chicken a merry, hawk de near", "who the cap fits", "everyday bucket a go a well'. In fact Marley could talk in parables and 'Jamaican expressions' at length, when he did not want to be too direct.

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
3/18/17 9:30:24 PM 
In reply to bravos

I never feel how I feel in a Caribbean country a few mins away,it's like a homecoming,its like family,you in foreign but you unnastan dem and dey unnasatn you


In my case almost every Caribbean Island I visit people ask me if I have family there. big grin big grin big grin

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
3/20/17 5:41:38 PM 
I am in the Yard and hearing some expressions I haven't heard for a while.

Bob made "chicken a merry, hawk deh near" famous.

Here are some others.

"Trouble deh a bush, Anancy bring it come a yard."

"Dog nuh howl when him have bone."

"Tek sleep mark death."

More later.

link Chrissy Joined: Nov 14, 2002
Posts: 144139
3/21/17 5:42:46 PM 
avatar image
In reply to Headley

Nice thread lol

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
3/21/17 6:37:13 PM 
In reply to Chrissy

Thanks. You will like this one. big grin

"Cock mouth kill cock."
This is a favourite of Jamaican politics and it have been used to good effect on a few occasions. A well know example is below.

And, boy, did he take it to Peter Phillips and Portia? Little did he know, however, that he was about to be hoisted by his own petard. Alas, "cock mout kill cock". The Development Bank of Jamaica $80-million Outameni write-off that he accused the PNP of approving, occurred in 2011, under the JLP Administration and Cabinet of which Andrew Holness and Audley Shaw were senior members.

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
4/7/17 3:56:55 PM 
1. Same knife weh stick sheep stick goat

2. Thief from thief God laff

3. Weh gone bad a morning can’t come good a evening

4. Sorry fi maga (meager) dog, maga dog tun round bite yuh

link bravos Joined: Oct 14, 2009
Posts: 32868
4/13/17 1:57:03 AM 
In reply to Headley

"Yuh/meh foot short"

"Yuh have short foot" rolleyes

When you just miss something or always missing out on something by reaching just a little too late. smile

link bravos Joined: Oct 14, 2009
Posts: 32868
4/13/17 1:58:26 AM 
In reply to Headley

"he living quite o quite"

"living behind god back"

Living far country or some hard to find place..

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
4/13/17 4:03:44 PM 
In reply to bravos

"Yuh have short foot"

Nice one. Never heard it before. Could be misinterpreted. big grin


"he living quite o quite"

Remember hearing this one decades ago. big grin Still like it. big grin

link BeatDball Joined: Jul 20, 2014
Posts: 4591
4/14/17 9:00:40 AM 
Walk good - have a nice trip.
He belly full - he's complacent N doesn't GAS!

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
4/14/17 2:38:58 PM 
In reply to BeatDball

Walk good - have a nice trip.


Hope you don't mind if I explain for those not familiar with the expression.

Walk good is an old Ja expression popularised by the late Ken Maxwell in the 1960-70s. Ken was a popular, white Jamaican comedian and raconteur. It has become very popular in the 140 characters era.

link BeatDball Joined: Jul 20, 2014
Posts: 4591
4/14/17 4:31:23 PM 
In reply to Headley Sah! Meh nuh jewmaycan....and I tort u were guyneez!
But, if I remembered correctly....in the 70s, I would hear Ole guyneez on leg 1 island use - walk good.

link BeatDball Joined: Jul 20, 2014
Posts: 4591
4/14/17 4:34:37 PM 
My wife's favorite - u nah have meh on bed-of-roses! Well, to be honest...this hard working chic has me on.....meh feel shame!

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
4/15/17 1:12:59 PM 
In reply to BeatDball

Just from reading this thread you will realise that a number of the old expressions are really used across the Caribbean and there are some that Jamaica and Guyana have in common. It was funny when Runs said that "bumbai" (meaning food put away for eating later) was a totally Guyanese expression only to find out that it is also used in Ja.

Well it seems you're a lucky man with a dedicated wife who will keep yuh on a bed of roses.big grin Try to stay on her good side. big grin

link Ewart Joined: Mar 5, 2005
Posts: 8644
4/15/17 1:49:59 PM 
In reply to Headley

1. Don't bill bush fi mek monkey run race

2. Don't watch the noise in the market ... check yu change!


//

link Headley Joined: Dec 2, 2007
Posts: 6507
4/15/17 4:20:31 PM 
In reply to Ewart

2. Don't watch the noise in the market ... check yu change!


Like this one. Never heard it before.


1. Don't bill bush fi mek monkey run race


This one is known. Still surprises me how many monkey expressions and monkey stories we have in Jamaica and yet we have no monkeys. Never had as far as I know.

Is this evidence of the power of story telling and oral expressions to record our African culture? If so how much longer will it survive?

link BeatDball Joined: Jul 20, 2014
Posts: 4591
4/17/17 7:08:24 PM 
In reply to Headley I can clearly remember my granny using, bambai! Runs' from the city...meh from country...we don't say, bumbai!

Very Happy Smile Sad Surprised Shocked Confused Cool Laughing Razz Embarassed Crying or Very sad Evil or Very Mad Twisted Evil Rolling Eyes Wink
 
Pages: previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  next