would concrete roofs help in hurricanes?

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link Norm Joined: Nov 28, 2002
Posts: 22546
9/12/17 2:30:33 PM 
In reply to Runs
Guyana seems very vulnerable and ill prepared for such natural disasters

Hurricanes could hit Guyana, and it would be a complete disaster if that occurs. Most of the buildings are wooden and will not survive a hurricane. (Many would not survive even a tropical storm.) The storm surge will wipe whatever survives the wind.

The Guyana coast, for up to about 20 miles inland, is also very vulnerable to tsunamis. Currently the most likely cause would be the eruption of marine volcanoes near the Azores, which could occur anytime.

Buildings in Guyana are designed to survive the frequent flooding that accompanies the heavy rains (by being raised off the ground), but not hurricanes or earthquakes. A few of the large buildings, such as the Bank of Guyana (which has a steel frame and concrete walls) and Brickdam Cathedral should survive, but others like St George's Cathedral (made entirely of wood) would not.

link Runs Joined: Jan 4, 2003
Posts: 46030
9/12/17 3:41:36 PM 
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In reply to Norm

Let's pray none of what you described ever happens. The government and citizens are not prepared and I shudder to even imagine the consequences. I have seen debates about it on social media hence my curiosity, some even said because we are close to the equator we are not in the hurricane belt. I am happy I can ask a qualified individual to get his expertise. Thanks. wink

link Runs Joined: Jan 4, 2003
Posts: 46030
9/12/17 4:10:40 PM 
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Here is an ex WI cricketer opining. I am amazed at the hubris.

"Today I'm in support of all my premier League brothers. You are welcome to win as big as you like! So the Champions League gods can smile on us.
In other news hurricane experts from Guyana stop trying to show us what would happen. We are not close to the hurricane belt and we are very close to the equator which spells good news for us.
Best wishes goes out all those affected by Irma". lol

link Norm Joined: Nov 28, 2002
Posts: 22546
9/12/17 6:35:52 PM 
In reply to Runs
The remains of trees uprooted over large areas of the Essequibo Coast hundreds of years ago are still there. Also, Caracas was struck by a hurricane less than 100 years ago.

The ITCZ (Inter-tropical Convergence Zone) along the equator, which is supposed to keep hurricanes out of the approximately 10-degree belt centered on the equator, is not stable. Not to mention, Guyana's coast is just outside of it.

So, some folks will bury their heads in the sand about such matters. One hurricane or tropical storm is all it will take to set Guyana back about 500 years.

link Runs Joined: Jan 4, 2003
Posts: 46030
9/12/17 7:29:28 PM 
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In reply to Norm

Amazing, thanks for the informative posts.
Taking back Guyana 500 years for a fresh restart may not be such a bad thing. lol

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