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Chrissy: it?s Good Friday - crack that egg..

 
Casper 2019-04-19 10:28:27 

...Before sunrise and let us know, later today, what image was formed.

Did you other West Indians partake in similar Good Friday rituals while growing up?

 
black 2019-04-19 10:32:12 

In reply to Casper

Is that ah GM ritual? Chrissy does that every week. lol

 
JayMor 2019-04-19 12:09:22 

In reply to Casper

Thanks for jogging my memory-- it hadn't passed that way in half-a-century. I don't think I ever witnessed anyone attempt that bit of lunacy, but there was talk of it in my early youth days.

--Æ.

 
Chrissy 2019-04-19 12:14:46 

In reply to Casper

Hahahahah - we never did that.
Let me tell you what my neighbours and I did on a Good Friday several decades ago - we were about thirteen or fourteen and we learned to smoke cigarettes. We coughed and coughed but we were smoking Dr. Low's Bristols. lol lol

My best Good Friday joke was taking Hot Cross Buns to Aunt Millie (who lived opposite our home). When I walked into her kitchen she was cooking chicken. I was a shocked preteen - Aunt Millie I asked - how can you cook chicken today. She laughed and said Lord if you want us to eat fish today, change this fowl to fish. She had a great laugh and I never forgot that one lol lol

What I learned early was that any disaster that happened on Good Friday was used to frighten people into staying home. It was ridiculous in a country where there were so many people who were Hindus or Muslims.

 
Emir 2019-04-19 12:43:59 

In reply to Chrissy

Nice story.

Growing up in a colonial- British-Euro Christian society where we were continuously coerced into accepting this imperialism as a superior way of life, I did partake in some Easter rituals as a child. But fortunately, my extended Muslim family never fell victim to this indoctrination but looking back, it was was remarkable how docile and accepting the African Orisha, the Shouters, the Muslim and the Hindu communities were towards Euro-Christianity intrusion into their lives and communities.

The few shops and businesses, none were Christian, were compel to shut their doors and as kids, we had to dress up with our Sunday best. Back then, the Premier and Governor General delivered formal state Easter address to "the nation" and the newspapers were willing participants, which made it seemed Euro-Christianity was a state religion. The Good Friday and Easter Monday were public holidays.

I still do enjoy Hot Cross Buns though. big grin

 
Chrissy 2019-04-19 13:47:25 

In reply to Emir

it was was remarkable how docile and accepting the African Orisha, the Shouters, the Muslim and the Hindu communities were towards Euro-Christianity intrusion in to their lives and communities.


Many wanted social mobility over everything else and therefore went to establishment schools where the indoctrination was none stop.

Yep - my mother made great HC buns.

 
Headley 2019-04-19 14:43:50 

In reply to Chrissy

She laughed and said Lord if you want us to eat fish today, change this fowl to fish.


Love it. lol lol

 
Casper 2019-04-19 14:56:58 

Well in Bim, church was very much part of my life, but for me and most my friends Good Friday service was too darn long, as we wanted to get to the city to watch some movie. By the time we got to movie theatre, poor we would end up in the pit, and would be scratching all over, as that section was usual full of bugs.

And who can forget, kite flying at that time of the year?

 
Chrissy 2019-04-19 17:56:03 

In reply to Casper

Kite flying was an Easter Monday treat - we'd set out early and spend the day at Beterverwagting beach - oh the kites!! Pure fun.

 
openning 2019-04-20 01:08:29 

In reply to Casper

I was a choir boy, 3 hour service was the norm, on Good Fridays.
So many crazy stories was told about that egg, frightening the hell out of the kids.
Don Bryan who was knighted not too long ago, made the prettiest Kites, and would place razors on the tail.