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HEADLINE: Fitness test may not be right for cricket

 
CaribbeanCricket.com 2020-02-07 16:16:13 

A lecturer in Sports Sciences at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, has questioned the relevance of the Yo-Yo test in determining the fitness of the region’s best cricketers.

While acknowledging it did measure “general, overall fitness”, Dr Rudolph Alleyne has suggested that the test might not be the best way to gauge the fitness of cricketers.

His comments have come following a decision on Monday by Cricket West Indies (CWI) to axe Shimron Hetmyer and Evin Lewis from this month’s One-Day tour of Sri Lanka after they both failed to meet the minimum standard of the Yo-Yo test.

During a subsequent interview with Barbados TODAY, CWI’s chief executive Johnny Grave maintained that players who wanted to gain selection to any of the West Indies’ men or women’s teams, first had to pass the test.

However, Dr Alleyne, who is also the Academic Programme Coordinator at UWI and has a degree in sports psychology and exercise physiology, said while the Yo-Yo test catered more so to aerobic fitness, cricket was more anaerobic in nature.

Read more at BarbadosToday


Full Story

 
Drapsey 2020-02-07 16:24:57 

In reply to CaribbeanCricket.com

Hetmyer and Lewis should sue.

 
doosra 2020-02-07 16:29:31 

“This test then has some relevance to general overall fitness but more specifically aerobic fitness. Sports like cricket, however, are predominantly anaerobic in nature – 95 per cent anaerobic and five per cent aerobic.


was hoping he would expand a bit more on this

 
vsingh 2020-02-07 16:35:50 

In reply to CaribbeanCricket.com

Minimum fitness level is 40, Cornwall and others given exemption

 
doosra 2020-02-07 16:37:36 

In reply to vsingh

so can someone say how they getting 40 in this test?

 
vsingh 2020-02-07 16:44:08 

In reply to doosra

Good question.

I remember when Skeritt took office he said people will be selected based on cricket and cricket only.

I understand what fitness is for, But Lewis was your best batsman in the recently concluded series and once hetmyer gets going he's unstoppable.

These guys should have an exemption too with a vision to reach or exceed the minimum requirement at next testing.

 
doosra 2020-02-07 16:45:22 

In reply to vsingh

i mean literally the number 40

 
vsingh 2020-02-07 16:46:58 

In reply to doosra

I am going to have to google that big grin

 
doosra 2020-02-07 16:48:46 

In reply to vsingh

we have been asking about it a while...the intl scores suggest 20ish as peak...cwi seh 40

clearly it;s a variant or somethign else big grin

 
Kay 2020-02-07 17:37:51 

In reply to vsingh

I understand what fitness is for, But Lewis was your best batsman in the recently concluded series and once hetmyer gets going he's unstoppable.

These guys should have an exemption too with a vision to reach or exceed the minimum requirement at next testing.

I am with you here. If anyone deserves an exception is the guy who averages over 50 in his last 5 ODI's when compared to the other fit batsmen acing the local (40) yo yo ....

 
vsingh 2020-02-07 17:49:36 

In reply to doosra

I am assuming 40 suppose to be 14 or something (Maybe there was a misunderstanding about the number) since I am reading India passing score seems to be 17

 
vsingh 2020-02-07 17:50:59 

In reply to Kay

Oh well, I guess they still have a re-test available.

 
InHindsight 2020-02-07 18:04:15 

However, Dr Alleyne, who is also the Academic Programme Coordinator at UWI and has a degree in sports psychology and exercise physiology, said while the Yo-Yo test catered more so to aerobic fitness, cricket was more anaerobic in nature.


That is an interesting assessment I, as many, hadn't thought of.


But it opens up for good debate.
I do recall hearing it said that our great fast bowlers of the past developed their endurance and stamina from continuous beach workouts.

This we know is easy on the body.

May the debate continue

 
Maispwi 2020-02-07 18:14:48 

In reply to doosra

I am assuming dat if a player does 2 4 minute miles he will get 100 which wud mean dat 40 eh all dat.

Surely by now CWI can enlighten de public. Wat happen to transparency?

 
Kay 2020-02-07 19:23:29 

But it is not that hard to achieve. Thankfully, only a low benchmark is set, meaning only a low level of fitness is required to pass the test. The benchmark of level 16 is not very hard to achieve. Maybe that is the point. Not much is expected, just a minimal level to show that the player has a basic level of fitness required to play a game of cricket, and is not hiding an injury.

I still don't get the CWI requirement of 40!

 
vsingh 2020-02-07 19:30:09 

I think I figure this blasted thing out!

Level 40 is 1600 Meters in accumulated distance . Essentially 40 meters is 1 shuttle/level.

 
Larr Pullo 2020-02-07 19:30:16 

This "Dr" Alleyne knows fuck all about cricket. Ever had to run a quick two then recover to face the next ball on a hot facting day?

 
Ewart 2020-02-07 19:36:51 

Ths fitness thing does not really apply to cricket.




It is more applicable to Lickit Cricket.


//

 
Larr Pullo 2020-02-07 19:40:25 

In reply to Ewart

Really?

When a fast bowler bowls 15 to 20 overs of a 90 over per day match, how many miles do you think he runs? When a batsman score a hundred how many miles does he cover in just running singles and twos etc?

 
Dukes 2020-02-07 19:42:50 

In reply to Larr Pullo

And you know fuck all about aerobic and anerobic respiration so allyuh equal!!!!!


lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol

 
Larr Pullo 2020-02-07 19:52:23 

In reply to Dukes

Differences. The main difference between aerobic and anaerobic respiration is whether or not oxygen is present. Aerobic respiration needs oxygen to occur, while anaerobic does not. During aerobic respiration, carbon dioxide, water, and ATP* are produced.

Examples of anaerobic exercise include heavy weight training, sprinting (running or cycling) and jumping. Basically, any exercise that consists of short exertion, high-intensity movement is an anaerobic exercise.

*Adenosine Triphosphate or ATP – is the primary energy carrier in all living organisms on earth.

Let me know if you need any more information.

 
camos 2020-02-07 20:19:58 

Man just throwing some shit out, sort of like Black in the back,notice he is just speculating.

 
Courtesy 2020-02-07 20:25:22 

So, the Yo-Yo test is good for the other test playing countries but not appropriate for we? Something is amiss here.

What needs clarification is the scoring on the YO-YO test as implemented by CWI.

 
Larr Pullo 2020-02-07 20:29:43 

In reply to Courtesy

The Sports Science department(UWI?) set the mark and confirmed with the Director of Cricket. So one of them two should know what a gwan!

 
Courtesy 2020-02-07 20:52:02 

In reply to Larr Pullo

Clarity, clarity, clarity. This is all we ask.

 
Dukes 2020-02-07 20:58:27 

In reply to Larr Pullo


Examples of anaerobic exercise include heavy weight training, sprinting (running or cycling) and jumping. Basically, any exercise that consists of short exertion, high-intensity movement is an anaerobic exercise.



However, Dr Alleyne, who is also the Academic Programme Coordinator at UWI and has a degree in sports psychology and exercise physiology, said while the Yo-Yo test catered more so to aerobic fitness, cricket was more anaerobic in nature.


the Yo-Yo test catered more so to aerobic fitness, cricket was more anaerobic in nature.



It seems to me that both you and Dr. Alleyne agree that the important aspects of cricket are ANEROBIC.

Dr. Alleyne says that the yo-yo test is AEROBIC testing.Is this where you disagree with the learned Dr.???


lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol

 
Larr Pullo 2020-02-07 21:10:54 

In reply to Dukes

The learned Dr. is only looking at the explosive aspect of some disciplines in cricket. EG sprinting after a ball, hitting a ball, running a quick single etc. However, what he is not taking into account is the aspect of aerobic aspect of cricket requires fast bowlers for example to bowl lengthy spells, or the bodies ability to recover quickly after exertion to slow down the heart rate so that the player can be ready for the next activity. In this regard Aerobic fitness helps greatly with a batsman's concentration. I would say in cricket aerobic fitness is MORE important in most of the activities related to cricket.

 
camos 2020-02-07 21:19:40 

the brain has a way of justifying shortcomings when one is tired.

 
Dukes 2020-02-07 21:34:26 

In reply to Larr Pullo

I must give you an A for effort but you have an insurmountable task when you say that AEROBIC is more important than ANEROBIC, when it comes to cricket.The tragedy is that I KNOW THAT YOU KNOW THAT IS FALSE

 
jacksparrow 2020-02-07 22:13:22 

People arguing all kinda things these days,it dont have to be true, as long as people willing to listen.

 
b4u8me2 2020-02-08 01:41:08 

Fitness is very important. This may explain why Heymyer keeps giving his wicket away because he is trying not to run too many singles or twos so he tries to hit boundaries all the time. He is too good to spend so little time in the middle. Our best batsmen should always be looking to bat long and bat most of the overs.

 
Larr Pullo 2020-02-08 02:42:14 

In reply to Dukes

For heavens sake man, present your thesis. You don't agree with me, then say why!!

You pusillanimous fellow!!!

 
Dukes 2020-02-08 02:51:53 

In reply to b4u8me2

Fitness is very important. This may explain why Heymyer keeps giving his wicket away because he is trying not to run too many singles or twos so he tries to hit boundaries all the time

Have you watched Hetmyer's 139 against India?If you did you would not make such a ridiculous statement.I did. a detailed analysis of that innings so I know of what I speak.Please speak what is true.the world is filled with lies and untruths so no need for you to add to it.

 
Ewart 2020-02-08 03:50:09 

In reply to Larr Pullo

Playing competitive cricket since 1952 (three centuries and nuff big score) and it is in this part of the 21st Century that I hearing about the need for "fitness" in cricket.

And if the antithesis of fitness is defined as Cornwall, because of his girth/weight etc., then I was never "fit."


But then...most of my cricket playing life was not 20-Twenty or Lickit Cricket.

Not saying I don't appreciate the stuff about aerobic and anaerobic. All that is good. Just saying you can't look on a man and say he is not fit because he don't look svelte.

//

 
Larr Pullo 2020-02-08 04:03:21 

In reply to Ewart

Just saying you can't look on a man and say he is not fit because he don't look svelte.


They're not. They're looking at his yo yo results... lol lol lol

 
Baje 2020-02-08 13:49:35 

The professor should write a paper and submit his thesis to a peer reviewed journal

 
camos 2020-02-08 13:53:36 

In reply to Baje

he does not need to, in the Caribbean if Dr comes before your name you get a seat next to god, no questions asked.

lol

 
Dukes 2020-02-08 14:20:54 

In reply to camos

he does not need to, in the Caribbean if Dr comes before your name you get a seat next to god, no questions asked.


I COULD NOT DISAGREE MORE!!!!

I know a doctor who is a TOTAL JACKASS!!!!!!


lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol

 
sudden 2020-02-08 14:43:53 

In reply to Dukes

Dr Rudolph Alleyne?

 
Dukes 2020-02-08 14:44:43 

In reply to sudden

Nah-- DUKES!!!!!!!


lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol